In Support of Excellence

It's all about the students

A New Padagogy Wheel: 你会说中文吗?

Download the PDF Poster below. All apps on it are linked to the Chinese iTunes App Store


Matt Harris博士是美国国际教育技术协会(关于ISTE)董事会候任主席。Matt将于2016年接任董事会主席,成为第一位不在美国居住和工作的主席。正如Matt所说

““我在EdTech担任领导期间,发现当代教育家热衷于使用技术来扩展和深化学习。他们中的大多数人意识到“现实世界”在不断变化,而现代教育学需要帮助学生在进入那个世界之前做好充分准备。然而,他们在使用特定工具实现这些新概念时经常遇到困难。Allan Carrington 的Padagogy轮模型正是为教师提供了一个简易的使用指南。该指南将apps和基于现代教育学和理论的学习产出相联系,方便教师在备课时从Padagogy轮查找最适合自己学生的工具,或者在课堂上使用该轮扩展或深化对某个21世纪技能或领域的学习。Padagogy轮将理论、实践和应用相结合,是一个宝贵的资源。因此,推荐每位教师将其引进课堂。 “

Matt HarrisMatt Harris,教育学博士
#EdTech领导|教师|导师|策展人 |
关注我的Twitter: (@mattharrisedd)

The Global Reach of the Padagogy Wheel continues

I was sharing the Padagogy Wheel project to a good friend and colleague in Adelaide and she made a suggestion the has led to two exciting months work and a learning model tool for the great nation of China.  Jasmine Yow is a translator and together we looked at translating the Padagogy Wheel into Chinese. As I thought about this I began to think about the possibilities.  I have since learnt that in China there are at least 14.6 million teachers in the K-12 space alone and 1.8 million teachers of English.  Add this to the number of teachers in Higher Education and Vocational Education and the numbers of Chinese speaking teachers who might be interested in this version of the Wheel is staggering.

We decided to explore Chinese Social Media which is quite different to what we know in other countries . We were both pleasantly surprised that there  are quite a few mentions of earlier versions of the Padagogy Wheel already online. In her research, Jasmine identified a blog which had written about the importance of the Wheel, as well as another university teacher who’s specialty is mobile learning. She facilitated my connection with both these academics.  I introduced them both to the latest Version 4.0 of the Wheel and asked could they help translate it into Chinese – thus began a great collaborative partnership which has produced the most customized useful poster yet and they have become friends.

Clatin_hdshot_100x75Clatin Chang
The Pedagogical Academy
HuNan Agricultural University
ChangSha HuNan Province

Jiao_Hdshot_100x73Dr. Jiao Jianli
Professor of Educational Technology
Director of Future Education Research Centre
Deputy Dean of School of IT in Education
South China Normal University Guangzhou, Province China

Dr_Jiao_and_Team_ThumbnailDr Jiao and his great team of specialists from South China Normal University truly captured the vision and supported the production of the Chinese version far beyond what I hoped for.  They workshopped the translation and used the activity to be Professional Development (PD) about pedagogy and technology.  We have set up a group in WeChat. This is a Skype and Twitter like program used across China – we chat daily.  We have brainstormed and clarified concepts for a number of weeks now.  Dr Jiao was kind enough to write a teaching piece  for language learning which is on the Poster. Then the team suggested we collaborate on a Chinese based blog in two languages. 如果你懂中文请访问

Clatin volunteered to help by auditing all the apps on the English Padagogy Wheel and making recommendations of apps more useful to teachers and students in China.  He did a fantastic job and introduced me to the Great Fire Wall (GFW) and I discovered that many of the Apps did not work in China. He provided the links for each app to the Chinese Apple iTunes Preview pages as well.  Clatin also suggested the idea about extending the support on the Poster to include teaching a language.

Features of the Chinese Version: The most developed Padagogy Wheel so far

  • Carefully translated into Simplified Chinese.
  • 124 Chinese friendly educational apps linked to the Chinese Apple iTunes Store.
  • Teaching in Chinese on how to use the Padagogy Wheel to learn a language.
  • Language learning specialty apps are highlighted on the wheel to help teachers design better technology enhanced outcomes.
  • More resources to explain the SAMR model are linked to help teachers understand this important concept.
  • Links to resources on Immersive Learning to help teachers develop pedagogies for developing graduate attributes and motivation.

There are two Versions of the Chinese Padagogy Wheel V4 Poster

  1. Chinese Padagogy Wheel Poster ThumbnailThe CHINESE Wheel Poster Print (4.3 mb): This is a bigger file size to print the Poster as an A3 or A2 hardcopy suggest laminated.
  2. The CHINESE Wheel Poster Screen (2 mb): Usually just for computer screen use.

The Wheel Road Map

We now have the Padagogy Wheel Learning and Teaching Model in four languages English, Spanish, German and now Chinese. At the time of this post, we have the following languages in production, Catalan | Dutch | Filipino | French | Greek | Irish | Italian | Japanese | Norwegian | Portuguese | Russian | Turkish | Korean and Arabic – 14 languages. However let’s not stop there. If you are interested in translating the Padagogy Wheel into your heart language, then please read this Translation Method and get in contact.

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A New Spin on Effective Individualised Learning

Maria Montessori Quote


Talk about a teacher ahead of her time, Maria Montessori passed the baton to Bloom. She died the same time Blooms was developing his taxonomy and quoting Maria Montessori is how Brett Salakas of St Kevin’s Catholic Primary School Eastwood NSW (Suburb of Sydney) introduces why he and fellow teachers  Jacqueline Matta, Greg Salerno and Esther Sultana undertook an Action Research Project in May 2014.   This project was to research and report the results of a quite unique  teaching and learning experiment.

They gave 116 students the Padagogy Wheel to use to design their own individualised learning. It gets more amazing as these students were 11-12 years old and when I first heard of this I was speechless and that for me is unusual. These innovative teachers took a Professional Development (PD) Tool designed for trained teachers, gave it to students with very limited support (scaffolding) and said “go for it”. Why does this remind of the family TV remote and Mum or Dad giving it to their child and saying I can’t figure it out  you fix it!

Padagogy Wheel V4.0 English PosterBrett makes the point in the podcast episode, that the Padagogy Wheel became the driver that the children controlled and it empowered them. This was creative individualised learning and it worked.  The teachers set up an iTunesU course and the students used the Wheel to choose learning outcomes, activities and apps to complete these activities.  They were even encouraged to use better apps than the ones’  Mr Carrington has suggested. This is awesome, if I had known at the time they were doing this, I would have provided a prize for the student/s who discovered the best apps for the job that were not on the Padagogy Wheel. I’m serious, the Padagogy Wheel is not about the Apps it is about the learning process.

Another wonderful strategy the teaching team implemented and managed, was how they encouraged the students to use the colours of the Cognitive Domain Categories. Students colour coded their activities (pages) of their iBooks they submitted to the iTunesU course.  This colour coding was also helpful to encourage the students to choose more of the higher order thinking domain categories and although they started more comfortable with just remembering and understanding, during the course of the project they tended to move around the wheel into the evaluating and creating zone of the taxonomy.  For a teacher wanting trans-formative learning it doesn’t get any better than that.

In the podcast interview Brett explains in detail how they set up the research and carried it out and then goes on to explain the surveying and what they discovered.  Both the students and teachers were surveyed about the entire experience.  Students were overwhelmingly supportive of the process..

I asked Brett about this paragraph in the report which can be downloaded below. The research reported:

“Graph 1.2 shows that 82.38% of the students thought that using the Padagogy Wheel through an iTunes U Course helped them to learn better in comparison with previous Science and Technology units …. These results inform that every eight in ten students thought that not only was the Padagogy Wheel, combined with an iTunes U Course an effective way to learn, but it enabled them to surpass the amount that they learnt in Science and Technology, without using these tools.”

My only reaction to these facts was “Good grief”! I am just beginning to appreciate the possibilities. That’s 8/10 students in a sample of 116.  What if this ratio held over much larger samples and across different subjects and even different educational cultures using languages other than English?

Matt HarrisMatt Harris, Ed.D   says that the Padagogy Wheel should be on the wall of every classroom, Brett and the team of teachers from St Kevin’s, have evidence it is a good idea. Currently, Matt serves as the Chair-elect of the Board of Directors for the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE). He will take over as Chair of the Board in 2016, becoming the first person to hold the post while living and working outside of the United States. Here is Matt’s endorsement in full

“In my experiences as an EdTech leader, I find that contemporary educators are passionate about using technology to extend and deepen learning. Most recognize the changing landscape of “the real world” and the modern pedagogies needed to prepare students for that world. However, more often than not, they find challenges in applying these new concepts with specific tools. With Allan Carrington’s Padagogy Wheel Model, teachers have an at-hand reference that ties apps to specific learning outcomes directly connected to modern pedagogies and theories. They can easily sit with the wheel during lesson planning time to find tools that will best aid their students or use it during class time to extend or deepen learning towards a specific 21st century skill or content area. This connection of theory, practice, and application makes the Padagogy Wheel an invaluable resource that should be on the wall of every classroom”.

Matt Harris, Ed.D.
#EdTech Leader | Teacher| Mentor| Curator |
Follow me on Twitter: (@mattharrisedd)

Please listen our podcast time together on SKYPE and download the report and consider the possibilities with your own teaching.  We now know that the students have no problems with the Padagogy Wheel … they just “get it” and learn more as a result.

Podcast Episode:

Contact me if you would like to do more research in this area of  Technology enhanced Individualised Learning using the “pedagogical pedigree” (to quote Brett) of the Padagogy Wheel.

Online Resources

Action Research Report: Will Using an iTunesU Course with the Padagogy Wheel, result in effective individualised learning? Download the Report

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A New Padagogy Wheel: Sprechen Sie Deutsch?

“Das „Padagogy Wheel” setzt die Idee der Motivation und Fähigkeiten optisch ins Zentrum. Dies ist eines der prägnanteren Merkmale als Modell:  das Ineinandergreifen der Technologie, des Denkens und der Motivation der Studierenden. Viele der Misserfolge in #edtech sind Misserfolge der #edtech Integration. Ansätze wie das „Padagogy Wheel” versuchen die Beziehung zwischen den Elementen des „großen Ganzen“ zu verdeutlichen. Es ist von zentraler Bedeutung, die einzelnen Teile – Tablets, Apps, Lernziele, kognitive Handlungen, etc. –in ihrem Zusammenspiel zu betrachten. Ohne diese Vision ist jeder Einsatz von #edtech nutzlos.”

Auszug aus dem te@chthought blog post:
German translated by Google Translate  Das Gesamtbild der Bildungstechnologie: das Padagogy-Rad  Original Article in English:

Padagogy_Whl_only_GERSMLThe Global Reach of the Padagogy Wheel continues

volkmar-langer-foto.256x256Twitter is an amazing Professional Development tool for Teachers. It also helps them expand their PLN (Personal Learning Network).  I met Volkmar on Twitter and after numerous exciting Direct Messages and emails he agreed to translate the Padagogy Wheel German Version. His full contact details are: Prof. Dr. Volkmar Langer, Präsident, Hochschule Weserbergland, 
University of Applied Sciences, Am Stockhof 2, D-31785 Hameln Deutschland. Volkmar  will be blogging about the German Version on the HSW-learn blog

There are two Versions of the German Padagogy Wheel V4 Poster

  1. Poster ThumbnailThe GERMAN Wheel Poster Print (4.6 mb): This is a bigger file size to print the Poster as an A3 or A2 hardcopy suggest laminated.
  2. The GERMAN Wheel Poster Screen (1.7 mb): Usually just for computer screen use.

The Wheel Road Map

We now have the Padagogy Wheel Learning and Teaching Model in three languages English, Spanish and now German.  At the time of this post, we have the following languages in production, Catalan | Chinese (Simplified) | Dutch | Filipino | French | Greek | Italian | Japanese | Norwegian | Portuguese | Russian – 11 languages. However  let’s not stop there. If you are interested in translating the Padagogy Wheel into your heart language, then please read this Translation Method and get in contact.

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At The Padagogy Wheel Core: Immersive Learning Targets Engagement

Padagogy Wheel Target

Jeff Dunn Edudemic“The new version of the Padagogy Wheel tackles a major question that is lurking in the back of everyone’s mind. If it’s not … it should be. It’s about the problem of motivation in education. How do we motivate students, teachers, parents, and everyone else to get excited about learning? How do you stay motivated? What works and what doesn’t?”

Jeff Dunn: Editor Edudemic
Blog Post:Updated Padagogy Wheel
  Tackles The Problem Of Motivation in Education 

KenSpero_withCaption_ThumbnailIn this third podcast episode with Ken Spero, a Senior Strategist with The Regis Company, in Philadelphia, USA we talk about how the pedagogy of Immersive Learning is ideal to tackle the problem of motivation and hits the bullseye at the core of The Padagogy Wheel.

Ken introduces Engagement into the equation and how it drives motivation for learning. He talks about the relationship between motivation and learning design, arguing that the more motivated the learner is, the less context and learning design is needed, and vice versa. – hmmm, now reflecting on that takes more than one cup of coffee for sure. Moving along the subject of “fun” came up and I challenged Ken about simulations being gaming. We then proceeded to discuss the difference between gaming and simulations. It is all about reality and alternate reality of the experience.

I asked Ken if he thought Immersive learning would help teachers work with mutually agreed graduate attributes and capabilities, helping the students embed them in their lives. His response that you can’t teach these in a classroom alone but have to witness them in the real world is fascinating..

We talked about how simulations are ideal for testing and modeling attributes and capabilities measured in context. Then the challenge, that you don’t suddenly learn a capability like “perseverance”.  These attributes and capabilities need to be observed – they are evidenced in behaviours.   You can teach about them but that doesn’t incorporate them into behaviour.

It is so logical when you think about it …or at least when you hear Ken explain the process. If we put the learner into a situation, which requires choices and has consequences in a simple context and story, if it is realistic and the learners are engaged, we can give the learner choices or options which are equally as good as each other but which demonstrate different biases, behaviours and preferences.

Instruction is fundamentally linear, however with attributes and capabilities a lot cannot be separated from each other, they are linked – a part of the same big picture.  We can provide instruction to address any of the fifteen listed in the capability list on the pedagogy wheel poster – but only one at a time. We can actually create simulations to manifest numerous of these 15 capabilities simultaneously in a story. A simulation allows us to leverage off these dynamics within the context of a story

Ken describes in detail how a simulation is a better way to provide a realistic context for learners to demonstrate attributes values and capabilities and provide a close to realistic way for learners to practice for the real world of work. He speaks of the need to adjust and prioritize.

laptopsplitarrowSMLBullseye! Immersive Learning has major advantages over conventional instructional design when addressing the core of the Padagogy Wheel model “Graduate Attributes and Capabilities”.

He goes on the talk about immersion not only for adults but how it can work for the K-12 learning environments Ken explains how to immerse students into the story… the context.  He uses history and the approach of having the students living in the experience … “a day in the life of” approach to a simulation.

He talks about scorecards reflecting the norms of the times and context of the simulation which makes the weighting of choices possible – how a scorecard is similar to a rubric. A scorecard reflects the core elements or behaviours and how we can address autonomy mastery and purpose … the puzzle of motivation.

I had to ask Ken in the middle of the interview … “OK I’m convinced, but how do you start to build a simulation? Is there a process and even better a checklist or template a teacher could follow when wanting to build a simulation for the first time?”  He proceeded to expand his six steps on “Getting Started” from his book “Scenario-Based E-Learning”. (see link in the online resources below).  Following is a direct extract of that section of his book … I can’t say it any better.

Getting Started

Developing a simulation includes elements such as plot and characters that may be new to many designers. However, by concentrating on your learning objectives and the desired performance outcome, you can give focus to your simulation and provide a rich and engaging learning experience. When designing your scenario, follow this six-step framework:

  1. Identify the specific problem or issue that needs to be fixed.
  2. Envision the desired experience. What do you want people to experience when they go through the narrative? Is it a change in behavior? Is it the application of a new skill? Do you want to reinforce something they have been taught elsewhere? Or to allow them to fail forward in a safe environment? What is the outcome you are looking for?
  3. Determine the timeline in which this experience takes place. Is it during the course of an hour-long meeting? A day-in-the-life? A week-in-the-life? A year-in-the-life? This will provide some necessary context for the narrative and determine its scope.
  4. Define success. How is success going to be measured in the experience? What are the learning objectives? Who are the stakeholders and how are they affected by a successful or unsuccessful learning outcome? Is there financial impact or only interpersonal? By truly understanding the scorecard, we can identify root challenges and how to successfully overcome them.
  5. Add conflict. Learners need to face a simulated challenge and solve it as they would in a real-life situation.
  6. Finish the story. After you finish the core narrative, you will be able to go back later and add branches if you like. These elements do not need to be detailed or formalised at this point—you just want enough information to provide a framework.

Now, you should have a solid foundation on which you can build a simulation that is compelling and results in better retention and transfer.

Listen to this podcast episode and download the very helpful job aid in the online resources listed below.  Please don’t just file it away for future reference. As soon as possible grab a SME (subject matter expert) and work through it. Get something on paper and start building a simulation.  Your students will be very grateful. Keep this up and the community will really appreciate your graduates – these graduates will truly make a difference.

Podcast Episode:

 It’s All About Engagement

Simulations are a tool to help students engage with the learning and I began to wonder what engagement-based learning might look like across an entire program – even across all education – and I found this TEDtalk by Gever Tulley on YouTube.  He targets big questions like: Where does competence come from? and  What kinds of experiences predispose children (and adults) to heroic behaviours later in life?

One of the major “ah ahas” for me in this video was “Create a meaningful experience and the learning will follow and do this BEFORE you design any sort of curriculum.  Gever goes on to define a new pedagogical unit he calls the ark. Watch this video and implement this model with simulations and filter everything you design through the grids of the Padagogy Wheel.  Start this at a school and arm your students with a portfolio as Gever describes and they will not only get through the university of their choice, but as graduates they will impact their worlds and make a difference.

Online Resources

Immersive Learning & Simulations Story So Far: If you would like to visit all the blog entries so far that are about Simulations and how to build what I have called ILMS’ (Immersive Learning Micro Simulations) using the latest multimedia software, please follow this link.

  • Scenario and Simulation Authoring Job Aid:  A four-page questionnaire designed as guidance for designers when working with subject matter experts (SMEs) to author a scenario-based learning program. In order to capture and deploy the most realistic and effective scenario possible, SME knowledge has to be transferred to the designer. This job aid will provide a process to capture and transfer that knowledge, through two design approaches. Approach A is an analytical approach. Answering the questions below will provide enough data to author a scenario. Approach B is a storytelling approach. Simply relate what happens in a typical day in the life of the person whose job is recreated in the scenario. Please note that names, situations, and specifics should be changed to protect the identity of the persons involved, and disguise the real-life situations if they are described to provide insight to the scenario. Download the PDF
  • Scenario-Based E-Learning: Ken Spero, ASTD INFOline series Oct 2012
Allan’s comment: This is a 16 pg. booklet published by ASTD targeted at and priced for the corporate marketplace. It sells for U$25.00. Ken mentioned a one off entry.  I was not able to check that for when I went to this search page, I visited a different one of the results and am now locked out.  Please take care on your first visit if you want to see the book
  • Learning’s Hierarchy of Tools: Addressing Transactional Need Through Experiential Simulation: In this article Ken talks about a model he calls “Learning’s Hierarchy of Tools and models it on Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs … well worth a read
  • Three Keys to Designing Good Scenarios: This is a short article but touches on three important tips for designing good scenarios
  • ASTD Philadelphia E-Learning SIG Presentation Capturing and Deploying Experience Through Simulations with Ken Spero:  This was a presentation Ken made at the ASTD in Philadelphia on Thu Sept 20th 2012. There are a good set of PowerPoint slides here for downloading.

Immersive Learning Today: Software Tools and Resources

The Padagogy Wheel Story So Far: I developed this concept in July 2012 for use in face-to-face seminars as an aid to understand how to best use the iPad for education.  The interest has been amazing and it has grown into a Learning Design Model for Technology Enhanced Learning and Teaching.  There is the latest version of the Wheel (V3) as well as help how to get the best use from the model, please follow this link.

  • Download the Latest Version of the Padagogy Wheel Poster: This PDF has all the Apps hot linked to their iTunes preview pages and other online resources. It could provide the backbone of a complete course or seminar on Learning Design. If you would like help with this please just ask.  It also prints well as an A3 poster. With QR Codes linking to this post and the Version 3.0 explanation.  You are also encouraged to print it out for use in your college or school.
  • Introduction to the Padagogy Wheel: A 2 minute video introduction to how the wheel works.
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Using The Padagogy Wheel: It’s All About Grey-matter Grids (GGs)

PadWheel V4 thumbnailDOWNLOAD THE LATEST VERSION: V4 published Mar 2015.  This PDF Poster has links to 122 of the latest and most popular educational apps.  Now these resources are available in 19 different languages.  The poster also has app selection criteria according to Blooms taxonomy.  It could provide the backbone of a complete course or seminar on Learning Design. If you would like help with this please just ask.  It also prints well as an A3 poster. With QR Codes linking to more online resources.  You are also encouraged to print it out for use in your college or school.

GETTING THE BEST USE OF THE WHEEL: The Padagogy Wheel was born out of a desire to help teachers at the coalface of teaching. I wanted a model that could be applied to everything from curriculum planning, development, writing learning objectives and designing student centered activities. Then quickly help teachers access relevant educational technology e.g. individual iPad apps or sequences of apps, to enhance those activities. Finally to help teachers use that technology to redefine activities to include tasks previously inconceivable. I believe this will increase student engagement, improve learning outcomes and empower a student towards transforming into an excellent graduate.

This model is a work in progress … always under review and improvement. Remember its purpose is a reminder to teachers to rethink everything they are doing. A warning: ignoring steps is in my opinion, part of the reason some of our teaching and learning, especially in Higher Education, is so ineffective in bringing about transformation. It is helpful to think about the Wheel as a number of grids through which you filter what you are doing – a way of thinking.

Energy of Intelligence

  1. THE ATTRIBUTES GRID: This is the core of learning design. Teachers or Educator/Academics must constantly revisit Graduate Attributes, things like ethics, responsibility and citizenship, as well as Capabilities for employment. They need to do the hard yards of articulating what they expect an excellent graduate of a program is to “look like” i.e. what is it that a graduate is and does that makes them and their communities define them as successful. Some universities at least in Australia and England, and I would expect in the USA, are constantly working on their graduate attributes and are mapping their programs to them. The blog post by Geoff Scott is really eye opening for college educators. Please visit “If you exercise these capabilities.. You will be employed!” If teachers don’t have a clear picture of the qualities and capabilities of an excellent graduate of their program is, then that is a huge problem and they need to set aside quality time to define this. Now when they have this list of attributes and capabilities, they need to look at their courses and pedagogy and ask ‘how does everything I do support these attributes?’ Is there any way I can build content and activities that help students become “excellent”? Have a look at what the University of Greenwich is doing in the UK. Please visit  “Graduate Attributes – Spin or Education?” and the podcast episode “What Does a Xxxxxx Graduate Look Like?
  2. THE MOTIVATIONS GRID: Once they are thinking attributes and capabilities, teachers then need to constantly revisit motivation. Asking themselves “Why am I doing this again?” That is not a joke. I am referring to the choices of learning outcomes, development of activities and design of content e.g. writing text and even making videos. So the wheel introduces a 21st century model of motivation that science has developed. It is so well presented by Dan Pink in the TEDtalk “The Puzzle of Motivation” Thinking through the grid of Autonomy Mastery and Purpose and filtering everything you do from idea-creation to assessment will, I believe, significantly help your teaching be transformational. Consistently asking the question, “How does the learning environment and activity experience I am building give the learner autonomy, mastery and purpose?” Asking that question and adapting what you do could change everything.
  3. THE BLOOMS GRID: The Blooms Taxonomy is really a way of helping teachers design learning objectives that achieve higher order thinking. You start by thinking “cognitive domain categories”. You start with “remembering and understanding” that’s the easiest category to serve with objectives but produces the least effective objectives in achieving transformation. When supporting academics, I recommend they try to get at least one learning objective from each category and always push towards the domain category of Creating where higher order thinking takes place. This is the “By the time you finish this workshop/seminar/lesson you should be able to. . . ” type of thinking. With the emergence of the importance of social constructivism i.e. research showing the effectiveness of student centric and activity based learning, those learning objectives need to be mapped clearly to activities. So a better question is “By the time you finish this workshop/seminar/lesson you should be able to <choose and action verb> BY <then choose an activity or outcome>. Now you are ready for technology enhancement.
  4. THE TECHNOLOGY ENHANCEMENT GRID: With learning objectives and outcomes sorted, now think about technology aka apps. How can this serve your pedagogy? You can choose any app or technology you like, the wheel only suggests apps that can support the learning objectives and activities at the time of publishing. The Padagogy Wheel constantly needs updating with apps as they are released. Teachers also should think customization all the time – is there a better tool for the job of enhancing my defined pedagogy?
  5. THE SAMR GRID: Now is the time to think about how to apply this powerful
    Sievemodel. For more information on SAMR  visit this Queensland Govt. Schools Classrooms Connections website. You need answers to such questions as “How are you going to use the technologies you have chosen”?  Take each of your activities and think through how you will use the technology for each task. Ask yourself “Does this activity just substitute i.e. students could easily achieve tasks without this chosen technology, or can I augment or modify the tasks  to improve the activity and increase engagement”? Finally sieve your curriculum building activities and your teaching practice through the SAMR grid of redefinition. Is there any task you can build into the activity that without the technology would not be possible? You can tell when you are successful with this, as there is bound to be one student who will comment “Hey that is cool!”

Please take the Padagogy Wheel out for a spin every day you are teaching and use it.  Then share your experiences especially your best practice … your colleagues will benefit from your collaboration, appreciate it and together we can build transformational outcomes and help students become excellent practitioners and graduates.



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