In Support of Excellence

It's all about the students

Using The Padagogy Wheel: It’s All About Grey-matter Grids (GGs)

padwheelposter thumbnailDOWNLOAD THE LATEST VERSION: This PDF has all the Apps hot linked to their iTunes preview pages and other online resources. It could provide the backbone of a complete course or seminar on Learning Design. If you would like help with this please just ask.  It also prints well as an A3 poster. With QR Codes linking to this post and the Version 3.0 explanation.  You are also encouraged to print it out for use in your college or school.

GETTING THE BEST USE OF THE WHEEL: The Padagogy Wheel was born out of a desire to help teachers at the coalface of teaching. I wanted a model that could be applied to everything from curriculum planning, development, writing learning objectives and designing student centered activities. Then quickly help teachers access relevant educational technology e.g. individual iPad apps or sequences of apps, to enhance those activities. Finally to help teachers use that technology to redefine activities to include tasks previously inconceivable. I believe this will increase student engagement, improve learning outcomes and empower a student towards transforming into an excellent graduate.

This model is a work in progress … always under review and improvement. Remember its purpose is a reminder to teachers to rethink everything they are doing. A warning: ignoring steps is in my opinion, part of the reason some of our teaching and learning, especially in Higher Education, is so ineffective in bringing about transformation. It is helpful to think about the Wheel as a number of grids through which you filter what you are doing – a way of thinking.

Energy of Intelligence

  1. THE ATTRIBUTES GRID: This is the core of learning design. Teachers or Educator/Academics must constantly revisit Graduate Attributes, things like ethics, responsibility and citizenship, as well as Capabilities for employment. They need to do the hard yards of articulating what they expect an excellent graduate of a program is to “look like” i.e. what is it that a graduate is and does that makes them and their communities define them as successful. Some universities at least in Australia and England, and I would expect in the USA, are constantly working on their graduate attributes and are mapping their programs to them. The blog post by Geoff Scott is really eye opening for college educators. Please visit “If you exercise these capabilities.. You will be employed!” If teachers don’t have a clear picture of the qualities and capabilities of an excellent graduate of their program is, then that is a huge problem and they need to set aside quality time to define this. Now when they have this list of attributes and capabilities, they need to look at their courses and pedagogy and ask ‘how does everything I do support these attributes?’ Is there any way I can build content and activities that help students become “excellent”? Have a look at what the University of Greenwich is doing in the UK. Please visit  “Graduate Attributes – Spin or Education?” and the podcast episode “What Does a Xxxxxx Graduate Look Like?
  2. THE MOTIVATIONS GRID: Once they are thinking attributes and capabilities, teachers then need to constantly revisit motivation. Asking themselves “Why am I doing this again?” That is not a joke. I am referring to the choices of learning outcomes, development of activities and design of content e.g. writing text and even making videos. So the wheel introduces a 21st century model of motivation that science has developed. It is so well presented by Dan Pink in the TEDtalk “The Puzzle of Motivation” Thinking through the grid of Autonomy Mastery and Purpose and filtering everything you do from idea-creation to assessment will, I believe, significantly help your teaching be transformational. Consistently asking the question, “How does the learning environment and activity experience I am building give the learner autonomy, mastery and purpose?” Asking that question and adapting what you do could change everything.
  3. THE BLOOMS GRID: The Blooms Taxonomy is really a way of helping teachers design learning objectives that achieve higher order thinking. You start by thinking “cognitive domain categories”. You start with “remembering and understanding” that’s the easiest category to serve with objectives but produces the least effective objectives in achieving transformation. When supporting academics, I recommend they try to get at least one learning objective from each category and always push towards the domain category of Creating where higher order thinking takes place. This is the “By the time you finish this workshop/seminar/lesson you should be able to. . . ” type of thinking. With the emergence of the importance of social constructivism i.e. research showing the effectiveness of student centric and activity based learning, those learning objectives need to be mapped clearly to activities. So a better question is “By the time you finish this workshop/seminar/lesson you should be able to <choose and action verb> BY <then choose an activity or outcome>. Now you are ready for technology enhancement.
  4. THE TECHNOLOGY ENHANCEMENT GRID: With learning objectives and outcomes sorted, now think about technology aka apps. How can this serve your pedagogy? You can choose any app or technology you like, the wheel only suggests apps that can support the learning objectives and activities at the time of publishing. The Padagogy Wheel constantly needs updating with apps as they are released. Teachers also should think customization all the time – is there a better tool for the job of enhancing my defined pedagogy?
  5. THE SAMR GRID: Now is the time to think about how to apply this powerful
    Sievemodel. For more information on SAMR  visit this Queensland Govt. Schools Classrooms Connections website. You need answers to such questions as “How are you going to use the technologies you have chosen”?  Take each of your activities and think through how you will use the technology for each task. Ask yourself “Does this activity just substitute i.e. students could easily achieve tasks without this chosen technology, or can I augment or modify the tasks  to improve the activity and increase engagement”? Finally sieve your curriculum building activities and your teaching practice through the SAMR grid of redefinition. Is there any task you can build into the activity that without the technology would not be possible? You can tell when you are successful with this, as there is bound to be one student who will comment “Hey that is cool!”

Please take the Padagogy Wheel out for a spin every day you are teaching and use it.  Then share your experiences especially your best practice … your colleagues will benefit from your collaboration, appreciate it and together we can build transformational outcomes and help students become excellent practitioners and graduates.

Allan

 

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The Padagogy Wheel V2.0: It’s all about transformation and integration

PadWheelV2_280513small

I knew I was onto something useful when I first put the Padagogy Wheel together in July 2012. It was always designed to be a starting point to be developed further. It was originally meant to be an aid for my face-to-face PADAGOGY seminars which are mentioned in my post “The Padagogy Wheel … it’s a Bloomin’ Better way to Teach“.  I have introduced over 600 university faculty staff to iPads in Learning and Teaching in about 20 universities in five countries in the last 3 years … I have talked a lot about iPads and can speak with some authority when I say that many teachers start at the wrong end of the process and try to work out how to use the features of the latest cool app and then think out what pedagogies will fit it.  The motivation for the Padagogy Wheel was “How do we show teachers that the pedagogy should drive the technology and not the other way around?  I am thrilled that in the first three weeks of May 2013 the Wheel poster was downloaded 6500 times and this blog is averaging 1000 visits a day at the time of publishing this post.

So why the need for Version 2.0? What are the changes, and is it worth downloading again? I will share some of my thinking and the “ah ahas”

We need to have transformation at the core of what we do: If it is all about the students, where do you start with curriculum and/or teaching design – surely it is with what do you want your graduates to look like?  i.e. what sort of capabilities and attributes should they have at the completion of your program or course. In the podcast episode “If you exercise these capabilities.. you will be employed!”  Prof Geoff Scott of UWS lists 15 graduate capabilities research has shown are requested by business.  These are all about transformational teaching and learning and one of the major “ah ahas” for me is that these capabilities are for the most part not targeted by our courses and programs in universities and colleges. Ask yourself the question “How many of these 15 capabilities I could confidently say are embedded in or even just touched on by the learning outcomes in my course”? To help teachers graduate attributes and capabilities are now at the core of the Padagogy Wheel V2.0 … The hope is teachers will reflect on these often when building curriculum and actually teaching and work out how they can build activities to help students excel as graduates in their chosen professions.

SAMRdiagramTechnology integration into the fabric of learning and teaching: is where we should be heading with all we do as teachers.  We need to ask ourselves are we using the technology to its best advantage to empower students to be all they can be or do we just use it because everyone’s doing it. How to best think about integrating technology and maximising its impact was really stretched when I met Dr P. as we call him in the Apple Distinguished Educator Community.  Dr Ruben Puentedura developed the SAMR Model, which is of great help when designing activities to support learning outcomes.  Consider it a grid to filter your choices made with help of the wheel.  Think about how you can design activities to not just use technology as substitution but to incorporate redefinition as much as possible. Much has been written about this model and incorporating it as a filter on the outside of the Padagogy Wheel V2.0 will I think help teachers come up with some innovative outcomes and activities that improve student engagement.

Finally, can you help with V3.0?:  There’s more we can do with this concept.  Mobile learning and the use of tablets are fuelling a heap of new and useful apps to help learning and teaching. How do we keep the wheel up-to-date?  Of course apps can also sit in more than one cognitive domain and I encourage teachers to think outside the box when choosing apps for activities. Not just adding and/or replacing new apps but there is the strength of combining two or more apps into learning sequences or activity flows and the outcomes learnt from using them this way. e.g. If I combine App A. with App B. and have students complete these activities using both these apps, do we get increased student engagement and much stronger learning outcomes?  If we do, then does this help transform the learners?  Also how do we gather and share lesson plan exemplars and the best practice creative use of App sequences to achieve higher order thinking from the learners? Wouldn’t these activity sequences be helpful to many teachers in the form of templates?

Please join in the conversation with your ideas and comments using the comments area of this blog.

Online Resources

  1. PADAGOGY WHEEL V2.0: This is a web page with a larger image of the wheel with iPad Apps hotlinked to iTunes Preview pages – published 280513
  2. PADAGOGY 101 What’s all the fuss about iPads in HE: This is an introduction to the iPad and contains reference to 29 iPad Apps from Document Readers to Project Management and links to 12 Video tutorials URL: http://www.unity.com.au/pad101
  3. PADAGOGY 201 It’s a Bloomin’ Better Way to Teach: This seminar gives ideas of the latest use of the Bloom’s Digital Taxonomy and how the iPad can serve the pedagogy. It has reference to 62 apps with 18 video based tutorials.  URL: http://www.unity.com.au/pad201
  4. INTRODUCTION TO THE PADAGOGY WHEEL: A 2 minute video introduction to how the wheel works. URL: http://tinyurl.com/padwheelvid
  5. THE PADAGOGY WHEEL POSTER: Please note this poster is now Version 2.0 a major upgrade of the original Padagogy Wheel. This has been requested by many … it is a larger format PDF file. The apps are still linked and will look acceptable when printed as an A3 size poster if required.  URL: http://tinyurl.com/padwheelposter

Creative Commons License
The Padagogy Wheel by Allan Carrington is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.  Based on a work at http://tinyurl.com/bloomsblog.

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The Best Professional Learning Experience of My Career

Thats quite a claim for someone who has experienced as many learning and teaching conferences as I have and interviewed and learnt from 200+ thought leaders in Higher Education for our podcast programme over the years. When I was selected by Apple for the Apple Distinguished Educator’s Global Institute in Cork Ireland in July 2012 I never anticipated what a mind expanding event the entire experience would be. I was thrilled to be one of the 234 ADEs chosen from the 600 applicants and to have the funds to travel from my university award prize money. More of this experience below,but let’s start at the real beginning of the learning experience

Cork minus Four Weeks: About 1995 one of the first pieces of online education jargon I learned was “click brick and click” The idea of starting a learning experience online with the click of a mouse, then meeting  face-to-face (the brick), then continue back online with more mouse clicks.  It is the concept that influenced the development of blended learning. However I have never really seen it work as effectively as I did with the build up to Cork.  A month before the event we started using BaseCamp an online project management tool and putting into practice Challenge Based Learning.  We had four big ideas presented and all 234 of us entered into online community discussion to identify the essential  questions.  The discussion forums were reflective, mind expanding and very active. By the time we arrived in Ireland we had all chosen one of those big ideas areas we were interested in.  It was in these communities around a Big Idea where we split into small working groups for the week to define our challenges and make our pitch i.e. presentations.

For years when I travel internationally I do what I call a network crawl where I visit people/institutions with which I have contact, to learn from them and teach into them.  This trip to the UK was going to be no different. I contacted some colleagues I have met at some of those conferences, and asked would they like to meet and would they like me to talk about iPads. I never expected the response.  Five universities in three countries asked for seven Padagogy Seminars and extra meetings about LAMS. Wow I thought I had better upgrade the iPad seminars we (Ian Green from Adelaide and I) have presented to over 600 participants in Adelaide and elsewhere in Australia.

The Padagogy WheelSeminar Upgrade: I started with the skeleton of what we did and rebuilt it from the ground up using Keynote as the guiding presentation tool. The seminars by necessity are App centric and because not everyone has an iPad and if they do, nor the same apps the seminars need to be show and tell.  Their main function is to present a selection of apps that can be used for L&T.  I wanted more than this so I looked to the most well know learning model around the Bloom’s Taxonomy.  During the research I found all the great work people have done with Blooms and technology. However I had a interesting new idea of mapping iPad apps to the cognitive domain of the taxonomy and using the Taxonomy Wheel The Padagogy Wheel … it’s a Bloomin’ Better Way  to Teach was born. I also identified the need for a third more hands on workshop I will call PADAGOGY 301 which is under development targeted to a more specific audience.

By Popular Demand: I have learnt from the responses in Padagogy workshops, that academics are very interested in Simon Smith’s e-assessment system of marking assignments. I knew I would get heaps of questions from the floor in Singapore and the UK so I recorded a podcast episode with Simon. Quality Feedback: It’s all about the Students. explains more about this innovative e-assessment  workflow using iPads. I mention this in Padagogy 201 and now there is a resource for people wanting more. Its a total win/win for all stakeholders. The teachers save significant time and can enrich the feedback and the students reap the benefit of more personalised feedback.

Let the Games Begin - First Stop Singapore: The time in Singapore was very productive with four workshops/seminars well attended at the new Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine at the Nanyang Technological University.  It is an exciting new joint medical school by Imperial College London and NTU they are developing a very innovative curriculum using LAMS and iPads. The “Padagogy Wheel” created quite a buzz. I presented each of these seminars twice in two days

PADAGOGY 101 What’s all the fuss about iPads in HE: This is an introduction to the iPad and contains reference to 29 iPad Apps from Document Readers to Project Management and links to 12 Video tutorials

PADAGOGY 201 It’s a Bloomin’ Better Way to Teach: This seminar gives ideas of the latest use of the Bloom’s Digital Taxonomy and how the iPad can serve the pedagogy. It has reference to 62 apps with 18 video based tutorials.

I had a great interview with Paul Gagnon Director of eLearning at Lee Kong Chian. Collaborative Learning … What No Lectures!: is about how they are taking Team Based Learning and adapting the pedagogy to use iPads and LAMS.

The London Bridge ready for the OlympicsNext Stop London and a trip down the River Thames: This was a busy time with visits to four universities, but what a way to start, visiting the place where time starts and stops … Greenwich.  Simon Walker head of the EDU at Greenwich University had invited me to meet and talk LAMS.  When I got there I discovered they were doing some ground breaking work on Graduate Attributes. In the podcast episode Graduate Attributes – Spin or Education Simon talks about the long term initiative the University has to develop their academic skills and framework and push this into a pedagogical framework. How they involve the students and the tools they have developed is worth reflection.

Kingston University M25LTG:  When invited to present at this event while in London, I had no idea what that meant.  We caught the tube and some buses and eventually ended up at Kingston University for the M25 (thats the Motorway) Learning with Technology Users Group. A innovative users group of LT professionals from the University College Londondifferent universities across the wider London area.  Note to self – we need to start this in Adelaide South Australia. It was also great to meet Dr Ian Green my fellow ADE from the University of Adelaide while in London – it was unexpected. He joined me in the rest of the visits and seminars.

Blended PADAGOGY 201 and 101 seminars: were needed at London University and the University College London:     Tim Neumann a colleague and good friend from the London Knowledge Lab had organised a 2 hour iPad Seminar at London and another Australian colleague who works for UCL organised one there.  Both were well attended and Ian and I did our joint presentation as we always do. The response was very positive.

ADE Cork Day 3Transforming global education: (and learning a bit of Irish) reads the tee shirt we received on our arrival in Cork. Thus began an incredible week of professional learning managed by Apple but the real learning happened in the small groups.  The video at the start of this blog entry gives you an insight of what it was like and the visual journey is stunning thanks to the great photos that were taken there and shared by Daniel Woo of the University of NSW.  As the saying goes “It ain’t over ’til it’s over!”  Everyone who attended the event has committed to work to an October deadline to publish content on the ADE iTunesU. There will be significant curriculum published for the developing of teachers as an outcome of Cork.

Finally Scotland and The University of Edinburgh:  This was actually an email type I call “a G’day email” I literally looked up the university website ans found the team running a post graduate elearning course ans said “G’day I’m visiting Edinburgh and Edinburgh from the castlewondered if ….” four or five emails later we had set up a PADAGOGY201 workshop that filled up with registrations in 24 hours from announcement and had a waiting list. They said it was the fastest response they have ever had to an elearning event.

We had a successful  seminar and the next day started the marathon journey home. Edinburgh to London… changed planes.  London to Singapore overnight no sleep …. thank goodness 4 hours sleep in the airport hotel then back on the A380 now that’s a plane and overnight to Sydney still no sleep… then change planes again and home to Adelaide. Over 48 hours travelling… but it was worth it.

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Quality Feedback: It’s all about the Students

Simon Smith photoPlato in about 430 BC said that “necessity is the mother of invention”, just imagine what he would have said if he had an iPad :-)  Well it was necessity that inspired my colleague in the eLearning Team at the University of Adelaide, Simon Smith to develop a work flow for e-assessment that brings tears to an academics eyes … well almost.  Simon had to grade papers for some tutoring he was doing and like the skilful nerd that he is, he used technology to make grading assignments significantly less time consuming for the teachers, while cleverly providing the tools to help teachers deepen and personalise their feedback to the students.  BTW nerds are indispensable team members in the new age of 21st century learning design … teaching is all about the students and all about teaching teams supporting the learning.

In overview this is how it works. The Quality Feedback system Simon designed, is to be used on an iPad with a very sophisticated PDF annotation app called iAnnotate   FIrst the assignments are extracted from the University LMS and populate this web based repository. Teachers can then choose an assignment as needed.  Now it gets really smart as when the teacher clicks on the next assignment wanted for grading, the scripting automatically loads it into iAnnotate where there is an armoury of annotation tools and the teacher can quickly provide rich quality feedback to the student not only with text comments but also voice, but there is more.  There is a web based rubric like form that the teacher can make value judgments on the assignment and quickly generate an email based feedback summary. The thing that has proven most successful in improving the student experience is the richness of the feedback which when students read/listen to it they also sense it is much more personal.

This is win/win for both the teacher and the student. We are getting reports it saves about 33% of the teachers time would you believe.  Why don’t you look at the Vimeo video below look at the Quality Feedback website and then send Simon Smith an email and ask him to present to you and your colleagues … but be warned there may be a line in front of you.  I have seen two different universities competing to see who could invite him first :-)

Quality Feedback from Corey Durward on Vimeo.

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